Wednesday, May 03, 2006

Forsythia

Every time I drive down 213 toward Town Point Road, I think about the forsythia on the side of the road. They border the Lovett farm, and create a beautiful barrier when they are in bloom.

I did not begin to really pay much attention to plant life until after I graduated from college and got married. I can remember the first spring that I noticed forsythia. Their brilliant yellow flowers are awesome.

I remember thinking "how could I have never noticed these plants before?" Later that spring I saw my answer: after they bloom, they become rather mundane looking green bushes. Unless one is paying attention, they are rather unremarkable.

So I used to say that I like forsythia when they bloom, but otherwise I am not so fond of them.

The forsythia on 213 have changed my perspective. This long border of forsythia has been planted for 3 seasons now. When they were first planted there, they were all twiggy little plants spaced rather far apart. Now, there are stretches of big, lush, beautfiul bushes. But there are also interspersed stretches of scruffy little bushes that are almost no bigger than when they first arrived.

As the big forsythia bloomes, the scruffy twiggy ones looked dead.

But then it came time for the yellow blosoms to be replaced by green leaves. And those scruffy, twiggy, dead looking bushes now have green leaves on them. What a testimony to the power of life. What a statement about the clinging stubbornly to hope, even when it looks like death, in whatever form, has arrived.

To me, it is a resurrection story.

5 comments:

  1. The analogy for the forsythia is the way some associations are formed. They may start out as individual twiggy plants. But, when you give them care, nurturing, leadership and time they can blossom into magnificent creations. Sort of like what the church and its leaders do.

    Keep working on those twigs.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The analogy for the forsythia is the way some associations are formed. They may start out as individual twiggy plants. But, when you give them care, nurturing, leadership and time they can blossom into magnificent creations. Sort of like what the church and its leaders do.

    Keep working on those twigs.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The analogy for the forsythia is the way some associations are formed. They may start out as individual twiggy plants. But, when you give them care, nurturing, leadership and time they can blossom into magnificent creations. Sort of like what the church and its leaders do.

    Keep working on those twigs.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I, too, have enjoyed the forsythia and watching the varying levels of growth. I think it is interesting that the scrawny plants ARE able to survive but don't FLOWER.....they are not truly reaching their innate potential.....hmmm.....could that be me?

    Why aren't they blooming? I believe it is due to where they are planted....immediately made me think of the sower that sows his seed onto different soil types. I don't, however, believe that parable covers our forsythia. The problem with our forsythia is excess! They were planted in lower lying areas that get too much water. Now I'm reminded how important balance is to bloom the way God intended, and am reminded of the rich, young ruler.

    Why is it that I easily pray "Lord, help....I need...." but can't remember ever praying, "Lord, help.....I have too much...."?????

    ReplyDelete
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